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 We remember Ms. Beverly Pittman

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We remember Ms. Beverly Pittman

Ms. Pittman was called Home on Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021.   She was a mentor and role model for her students and a friend to her collegues. She will be greatly missed by all the people whose lives she touched.

Favorite quote:  I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.  Philipians 4:1

  • During this time Crisis team members will be on standby to offer support:

    • Complete the Individual Virtual Grief Counseling Session form to sign up to meet with a counselor one on one. http://bit.ly/WCSsupport2021. A counselor will reach out to the individual directly to schedule a meeting time.

    • If you or your child is in a mental health crisis please call 911 or seek help from the nearest emergency room.

Announcements

  • We recognize the great work of Kayla Griffin.  Kayla completed the virtual jobs shadowing challenge from the CTE Department.  Denise  Harris drew her name from students who completed the challenge and Kayla recieved a $25 dollar gift card.  

     

    Congratulation Kayla

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 WCMS Loves our Counselor

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WCMS Loves our Counselor

We want to recognize our School Counselor and all that she does for our school.  This is Ms. Candace Pitter's second year at the Middle School and she has become intregal to student wellness.  She takes care of all aspects of student life on school campus.  She cares about and works with students off campus to help in any way she can.  Ms. Pitter,  Thank you for all you do. 

                                  Washington County Schools:

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Teacher of the Year

Ms. Sandra Arnold

2020-2021

8th Grade English Language Arts 

Looking Forward

  • Secret Basketball

    Game of 1944

    Basketball

     

    During the Jim Crow era, African American college teams were barred from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the National Invitational Tournament (NIT). But a brave few found ways around these restrictions. A secret game held in 1944 between a white team from Duke University and a black team from North Carolina Central University was one of the first integrated sports events in the South.

    In early 1944, black and white students from North Carolina Central University and Duke University met at the Durham YMCA for clandestine prayer meetings. A friendly challenge led to a basketball game between the NCCU varsity team and the team from Duke’s medical school to determine the best team in Durham.

    It was a match-up of heavyweights. Many believed that Duke’s medical school team was even better than the school’s varsity team, which had won the Southern Conference championship. Across town, John B. McLendon coached the NCCU Eagles to an impressive 19-1 record. 

     

    The two teams scheduled the game for Sunday, March 12, 1944, when most of Durham’s citizens were at church.  Because transporting the NCCU team to Duke’s campus would have been difficult, the teams arranged to play at NCCU. As the Duke players arrived on campus in borrowed cars, they hurried into the gym, after which Coach McLendon locked the doors. In the gym, there were only players, coaches, and a referee; a few students peered through gym windows to watch. The Eagles used a fast-break strategy created by McLendon and won 88-44.

    After the informal game, the two teams integrated their rosters and played skins and shirts. When this game concluded, the NCCU team invited the Duke students to the men’s dormitory for refreshments. After socializing for a few hours, the medical students returned to Duke.

    Sources:  Read the Complete article. 

    Duke Magazine http://www.dukemagazine.duke.edu/alumni/dm6/secret_txt.html (accessed August 3, 2010); New York Times, March 31, 1996;  "The Secret Game, Remembered" http://news.duke.edu/2010/04/secretgame.html (accessed August 3, 2010)

     

     

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